Roald Dahl Books Dominate Favourite List

RoaldDahlbooks

The response to our WriteRight iPad App Promotional Code give-away asked for entrants to share which children’s book they love sharing, or which children’s book was their favourite as they grew up. Roald Dahl’s books were constantly nominated, appearing regularly among the entries. Favourites such as: Charlie and the Chocolate Factory; Danny Champion of the World; The Twits; The Witches and ;Revolting Rhymes, were joined with the less well-known tales by Dahl including “The Vicar of Nibbleswicke” and “Going Solo”.

[pullquote]Roald Dahl’s books were constantly nominated.[/pullquote]The entries draw quite an eclectic mix of books but, for certain, the joy and experience of children being submerged into books is a remarkable gift that should be an important essence of childhood.

The list of books entered: (We are trying to fix the table size below – apologies for inconvenience)


One book that could not be added to the above list is: ‘The Wrong Book‘ by Nick Bland which is available via the Apple Australia App Store. Click here to view.

The winners of the give-away were drawn randomly from the entries received:

  1. The Paper Dolls By Julia Donaldson is my current favourite book to explore with my class. It helps children to understand that the actions of others cannot take away your thoughts and memories. We have described what our memories look like and discussed how everyone stores their memories in different ways. We’ve also discussed the importance if the grandmother in the story and each named people that we can only see in our memories. (Via @relativism)
  2. Going solo by Roald Dahl. It started my fascination with how people live their lives, a fascination that eventually led to a career in History teaching. (Via @HistoryHDHS)
  3. It’s Time For Bed by Mem Fox. Beautiful illustrations, rhyme and great vocab. Teacher/parent. Via (@5SKNthQld)
  4. Have so many…but ‘The Wrong Book’ by Nick Bland gets lots of giggles. (Via @angiemad67)
  5. The Iron Man by Ted Hughes. The scene that describes the reassembling of the giant haunted me for months after the first read. (Via @wallythebus)

The winners will be notified by e-mail. Thank you for all entries submitted.

Image Source

 

You need to or Register to bookmark/favorite this content.

About UKEdChat Editorial 3107 Articles
The Editorial Account of UKEdChat, managed by editor-in-chief Colin Hill, with support from Martin Burrett from the UKEd Magazine. Pedagogy, Resources, Community.

Be the first to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.


*