Boarding card and landing card by @PrimaryLessons

This idea has been developed from an idea in Talk-Less Teaching by Isabella Wallace and Leah Kirkman.

I used it in the context of a SPAG lesson where Y6 pupils were answering test questions in preparation for the SATs test.


This is a re-blog post originally posted by Siobhán Morgan and published with kind permission.

The original post can be found here.

Submit your blog post for reblogging on UKEdChat.com by clicking here. 
or via our free SmartPhone app. Click here for more information.

Preparation

In a previous lesson, pupils identified areas of weakness from mock SPAG tests and CGP grammar tests they had completed. I gave them a boarding card with SPAG topics. They used the previous tests to help them identify areas they needed to focus on in this lesson. Each area was colour coded with the questions, which were laminated in the correct colours.

The lesson

I turned the classroom into an airport with 5 ‘airline staff’ who were children secure in L5 grammar. The rest of the class were ‘passengers’.

All pupils had their boarding cards. They went to he staff to ‘check in their spaggage’ and were directed to a particular question type by the staff. The staff had all the answers, a grammar revision guide and a whiteboard and pen to help them resolve any misconceptions with passengers.

Passengers completed a question, returned to the check-in desk, their form was initialed by staff and then passengers repeated the activity.

Pupils had a form to fill in with the question number, topic, quick smiley face to  show their understanding, and a column to say whether they needed further support with that particular topic.

The landing card (reflecting on learning and future learning)

Before the end of the lesson, pupils again queued at the check-in desks to receive their landing card. This was almost exactly the same as their boarding card. Pupils could seek help from airline staff if necessary.

landing_card-compressorUsing their form and boarding card, pupils ticked areas they needed further support with in future.


You need to or Register to bookmark/favorite this content.

About UKEdChat Editorial 3072 Articles
The Editorial Account of UKEdChat, managed by editor-in-chief Colin Hill, with support from Martin Burrett from the UKEd Magazine. Pedagogy, Resources, Community.

Be the first to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.


*