UKEdMag: Computational Thinking for teachers by @iMerinet

computational

Computational thinking: Teaching coding is a method of teaching computational thinking. Computation thinking is the thinking process used to solve problems. It is to ensure adults of the future understand how technology works and why it works that way. Computational thinking and digital technologies incorporate coding, robotics, STEM, construction, problem solving and design thinking.

This article originally appeared the March 2017 edition of UKEdMagazine

Computational thinking does not need to be taught exclusively as a subject. It is best to teach it embedded in other subjects eg: science and maths projects. It is time the education system moved away from teaching content and teaching children how to think, design and create for themselves. Many teachers struggle with where to start with learning to teach computational thinking or digital technologies.

The University of Adelaide runs free online courses for teachers to learn “What is computational thinking?” and “How to apply it in a classroom”. The course is suitable for teachers of all grades and the ideas cover many different subject areas. It provides a common language for teachers to discuss the thinking process, lesson ideas and how to code. The courses are located at csermoocs.adelaide.edu.au/moocs

Australian teachers also benefit from the added support of project officers in each state who facilitate workshops to up-skill teachers. Now is the time to learn about the phenomenon sweeping the world.

Coding and Robotic tools discussed in the courses and workshops include:

  • pencilcode.net
  • scratch.mit.edu
  • scratchjr.org
  • bee-bot.us
  • ozobot.com
  • sphero.com
  • makeymakey.com
  • arduino.cc

@iMerinet NSW Project Officer, University of Adelaide – NSW, Australia

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