Deaf children in England are falling behind their classmates from primary school through to GCSE

The BBC reports that analysis by the National Deaf Children’s Society shows that deaf children in England are falling behind their classmates from primary school through to GCSE.

Analysis shows that only 30.6% achieve a GCSE strong pass – Grade 5 or above – in both English and maths, compared with 48.3% of children with no special educational needs.

And 57% fail to reach expected levels in reading, writing and maths in Sats tests at the end of primary, compared with 26% of children with no SEN.

The NCDS urges more government funding.

Its analysis of government data suggests the average Attainment 8 score (how well pupils do across eight core subjects) for deaf children was 39.2 – but for those with no SEN, the average was 49.8.

In the story, a spokeperson for the Department for Education said: “Our ambition for children with special educational needs and disabilities, including those who are deaf, is exactly the same for every other child – to achieve well in education, and go on to live happy and fulfilled lives.

“We recognise that local authorities are facing cost pressures on high needs and that there is more to do which is why in December 2018 we announced an additional £250m in funding for high needs over this and next year.”

Read the full story at: https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/education-47212462

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The Editorial Account of UKEdChat, managed by editor-in-chief Colin Hill, with support from Martin Burrett from the UKEd Magazine. Pedagogy, Resources, Community.

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