Book: The Ladder by @EnterpriseSBox via @CrownHousePub

Published by Crown House Publishing

The Ladder Supporting Students Towards Successful Futures And Confident Career Choices

£16.99*
9.5

Content

9.0/10

Accessible

9.5/10

Authority

9.5/10

Practical

10.0/10

Value

9.5/10

Pros

  • This book is designed to offer resources that can be adapted for integration into different subject areas, suiting students and their ambitions.
  • Case studies are scattered throughout offering best practice examples for inspiration and sharing.
  • The book comes with many tools and resources, which are available to download for use in the classroom.
  • Andrew also picks up on the equality of career opportunities, including gender, geographical, and socio-economic challenges that may be viewed as daunting barriers many will have to overcome.
  • Andrew’s belief is that we have a duty to support young people onto their own career ladders.

Supported by Crown House Publishing


Choosing the right career path for most individuals is a constant dilemma, and in a changing society making the correct career decision can be harder for young people whose future paths are likely to change in ways we cannot imagine. As teachers, working in results orientated subjects, aligning the curriculum to future career paths can often be overlooked.

In his new book, Andrew Bernard reflects on his career in education and business development to bring clarity, focus and ideas to educators as to how they can best support students on their own ladders to success. For individuals, identifying talents, skills, and the potential opportunities for them to aspire to in the world of work is an important part of finding their place in society, giving them an identity of which they can achieve. Andrew calls on the reader to reflect on how they have undertaken their career path, identifying key influences, opportunities and barriers that got you to where you are. However, the book is designed to offer resources that can be adapted for integration into different subject areas, suiting students and their ambitions. Furthermore, case studies are scattered throughout offering best practice examples for inspiration and sharing, as well as suggestions for how partnerships with businesses can help to support young people.

Early on in the book, we are introduced to many tools and resources, freely available to download, that can be used with young people including a framework for self-reflection then be causing of skills and knowledge (CASK), a 7-skills assessment sheet, and wheels of life (aimed at different age groups), that looks at the key personal, social and emotional aspect of their lives. Andrew also picks up on the equality of career opportunities, including gender, geographical, and socio-economic challenges that may be viewed as daunting barriers many will have to overcome. The key here, the book argues is that careers advice needs to be provided earlier, broader, and better. The eight-part Gatsby Benchmark is also given due attention, with Andrew concluding that communities can pull together to support the education and life chances of young people.

(See Andrew’s presentation at the UKEdChat 2021 Online Conference … Review continues below)

A series of teaching tools are provided in the book including challenging stereotypes, support for underrepresentation in STEM careers. Additional resources, programmes, support and links are also highlighted, as well as giving much-needed attention to supporting students with special educational needs and disabilities with their career aspirations. Andrew highlights how the involvement of businesses in education is essential, arguing that schools should know the region careers hubs and opportunities which can be tapped into to help young people gain a clear idea of the aspirations. Towards the end of the book, a series of questions are provided pumped in discussions with the primary students, secondary students, and to be asked of businesses. Andrew concludes by saying how the bulk is based on his belief that we have a duty to support young people on their own career ladder who will be starting out in the world of work.

This is a great book for teachers who work at all stages of education to get their students to think about their career aspirations, fighting stereotypes of job roles, and showing that starting with young children can have a positive impact on how they achieve educationally.


*RRP – Correct at time of review publication.

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About @digicoled 390 Articles
Colin Hill - Founder, researcher and editor of ukedchat. Also a bit of a tech geek! Project management, design thinking, and metacognition.

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