Book: Good Autism Practice for Teachers by @Karen_N_Watson via @CriticalPub

Published by Critical Publishing

Good Autism Practice for Teachers

£18.99*
9.3

Content

9.5/10

Accessible

9.5/10

Authority

9.0/10

Practical

9.5/10

Value

9.0/10

Pros

  • This is a very accessible book for teachers and support staff that helps support inclusion.
  • Karen's passion in the subject is clear throughout, showing how a caring approach can yield positive relationships.
  • A great mix of templates, ideas, and resources are shared throughout, helping the reader develop further their classroom experiences.
  • The 'Pause for Thought', and 'Key Information' snippets throughout advocate reflective professional questions that can help improve practice.
  • This is a fantastic book for educators working in any school setting. The focus is not on policy or legislation, but on supporting autistic pupils so that they can thrive.

Supported by Critical Publishing


This is an accessible guide for all trainees and teachers, providing practical, evidence-informed ways to support neurodivergent learners that will also benefit all pupils. 

It takes a close look at the theory around autism, including procedural /semantic memory, executive functioning, expressive/receptive language, sensory integration, behaviour as communication, and the importance of emotional literacy, co-regulation and resilience. It then delivers plenty of practical advice and suggestions to incorporate these ideas into day-to-day teaching, presenting high-quality strategies to promote positive relationships and maximise teaching and learning outcomes. The book moves away from labels and encourages good inclusion practice to address the full range of needs in both mainstream primary and secondary classrooms.


*RRP – Price correct at time of review publication

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About @digicoled 437 Articles
Colin Hill - Founder, researcher and editor of ukedchat. Also a bit of a tech geek! Project management, design thinking, and metacognition.

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